Not-for-Profit, Award-Winning Community News and Views for Windham County, Vermont • Since 2006
Life and Work

Leading scholar on Holocaust to present talk in Brattleboro

For more information, visit www.aauwvt.org or call 802-387-5875.

BRATTLEBORO—The work of the Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies is the topic of a talk by the center’s director, Henry “Hank” Knight, on Tuesday, Nov. 18, at 7 p.m. in the West Village Meeting House.

Located at Keene State College, the center was founded in 1983 by Dr. Charles Hildebrandt and is devoted to the memory and study of the Holocaust and genocide.

The program is co-sponsored by the Brattleboro branch of the American Association of University Women, the Brattleboro Area Jewish Community, and All Souls Unitarian/Universalist Church.

Knight has been the center’s director since 2007. He came to KSC from Tulsa, Okla., where, over 16 years, he served the Jewish Federation of Tulsa as director of the Council for Holocaust Education, taught “The Christian Problem of the Holocaust” at Phillips Theological Seminary, and was University chaplain and applied associate professor of hermeneutic and Holocaust studies at the University of Tulsa.

A graduate of the University of Alabama (English Literature) and Emory University’s Candler School of Theology, Knight is an ordained Methodist minister who specializes in post-Holocaust Christian theology.

His publications include “Confessing Christ in a Post-Holocaust World,” “The Holy Ground of Hospitality: Good News for a Shoah-Tempered World,” and “Locating God: Placing Ourselves in a Post-Shoah World.”

In 1996, Knight co-founded the Pastora Goldner (now Stephen S. Weinstein) Holocaust Symposium, an international gathering of Holocaust and genocide scholars that meets biennially at Wroxton College in northern Oxfordshire, England.

Knight co-chairs the symposium with Leonard Grob of Fairleigh Dickinson University.

AAUW is a national organization that advances education and equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy and research. The Brattleboro branch was founded in 1926.

Like what we do? Help us keep doing it!

We rely on the donations and financial support of our readers to help make The Commons available to all. Please join us today.

What do you think? Leave us a comment

Editor’s note: Our terms of service require you to use your real names. We will remove anonymous or pseudonymous comments that come to our attention. We rely on our readers’ personal integrity to stand behind what they say; please do not write anything to someone that you wouldn’t say to his or her face without your needing to wear a ski mask while saying it. Thanks for doing your part to make your responses forceful, thoughtful, provocative, and civil. We also consider your comments for the letters column in the print newspaper.

Comments

We are currently reconfiguring our comments software. Please check back if you’d like to read or leave comments on this story. —The editors

Originally published in The Commons issue #280 (Wednesday, November 12, 2014). This story appeared on page A4.

Related stories