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The Commons
The Arts

'Spring Visions' featured at MGFA

Mitchell-Giddings Fine Arts opened in 2014 with seven artists and enters 2017 with 30 established artists working in a variety of traditional and unusual materials. Call 802-251-8290 for more information or visit mitchellgiddingsfinearts.com.

Originally published in The Commons issue #395 (Wednesday, February 15, 2017). This story appeared on page B2.



BRATTLEBORO—Through March 12, Mitchell-Giddings Fine Arts, 183 Main St., presents “Spring Visions,” a new group exhibition expanding upon December’s Winter Group.

The show will feature a new selection of work by gallery artists, including Emily Mason, Torin Porter, Anne Johnstone, Eric Boyer, Jon Gregg, Tiffany Heerema, and Robin Cheung. An artist forum of featured artists will take place Saturday, Feb. 25 from 5 to 7 p.m.

According to a news release, New York painter and printmaker Emily Mason creates singularly rich abstract images; sculptor Torin Porter of Glover engages the imagination with his playful, stylized steel figures; painter and collage artist Anne Johnstone from Somerville, Massachusetts, works in collage and mixed media to convey a curiously heightened emotional response.

Sculptor Eric Boyer of Portland, Oregon, manipulates wire mesh to create exquisite human and abstract forms. Jon Gregg is a painter well-known as the founder and former president of the Vermont Studio Center. Compositions by local collage artist Tiffany Heerema explore worlds that engage the playful spirit. Paintings by Robin Cheung of Acton, Massachusetts, draw focus to the beauty and elegance of archeological forms.

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