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The Commons
Photo 1

Courtesy photo

Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton.

The Arts

Jerron 'Blind Boy' Paxton brings the blues to Next Stage

Tickets are $22 in advance, $25 at the door, available at Turn It Up in Brattleboro and the Putney Coop, and online at www.nextstagearts.org. There will be a beer/wine cash bar. Next Stage is located at 15 Kimball Hill in Putney (across from the General Store).

Originally published in The Commons issue #429 (Wednesday, October 11, 2017). This story appeared on page B4.



PUTNEY—Bluesman Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton will appear at Next Stage on Friday, Oct. 13, at 7:30 p.m.

Paxton is an American musician from Los Angeles who now lives in Queens, N.Y. A vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, Paxton’s style draws from blues and jazz music before World War II and was influenced by Fats Waller and “Blind” Lemon Jefferson.

“Blind Boy Paxton is six-foot-two, but he only stands to get bigger,” The Village Voice wrote about Paxton, a young man who plays guitar, piano, banjo, and fiddle with equal mastery.

Only in his 20s, Paxton possesses a theatrical flair that excites audiences of all ages. Elmore Magazine called him “The new young hope of the blues world.”

Hot Tuna’s Jorma Kaukonen, who has shared the stage with Paxton, said he “just knocked our socks off. His show was something I can hardly wait to see again.”

The New York Times’ Ben Ratliff called Paxton “easily the most talented young acoustic bluesman to come along in many, many years.”

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