News and Views

News

Voices

Arts

Life and Work

Milestones

Submit your news

Submit commentary

Support us

Become a member

Advertising

Print advertising

Web advertising

About us

Contact us

Privacy Policy

The Commons
Town and Village

WCHS takes in dogs and cats from shelters affected by Hurricanes Irma, Harvey

Originally published in The Commons issue #429 (Wednesday, October 11, 2017). This story appeared on page D4.



BRATTLEBORO—The Windham County Humane Society is hosting animals from Florida and Texas in an effort to help the communities affected by hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

Working with their long-term transport partner, St. Hubert’s Animal Welfare Center in New Jersey, the facility is taking in dogs and cats from Florida and Texas shelters.

As of mid-September, WCHS had taken in 101 cats and 252 dogs from southern shelters where they faced euthanasia due to a lack of space. Now the focus has shifted to animals that have been in shelters in Texas and Florida, so that kennels can be freed up to house animals displaced by the storm.

Transporting long-term residents north while keeping animals lost during the storm in their home state means owners can be reunited with a lost pet.

The WCHS has an average length of stay of just two weeks for cats, one week for dogs, whereas animals in southern shelters can wait months or even years to find a new home. Spay and neuter practices and progressive policies in New England mean most shelters in the Northeast have space to help animals facing euthanasia elsewhere.

To make sure kennel space is available, adult dogs currently at the WCHS have had their adoption fee cut in half, to just $100. The fee includes spay/neuter, microchip, up-to-date vaccines, I.D. tag, a free vet exam, and one month of pet health insurance.

For more information, visit www.wchs4pets.org or stop by the facility at 916 West River Rd. (Route 30) in Brattleboro.

What do you think? Leave us a comment

Editor’s note: Our terms of service require you to use your real names. We will remove anonymous or pseudonymous comments that come to our attention. We rely on our readers’ personal integrity to stand behind what they say; please do not write anything to someone that you wouldn’t say to his or her face without your needing to wear a ski mask while saying it. Thanks for doing your part to make your responses forceful, thoughtful, provocative, and civil. We also consider your comments for the letters column in the print newspaper.