News and Views

News

Voices

Arts

Life and Work

Milestones

Submit your news

Submit commentary

Support us

Become a member

Advertising

Print advertising

Web advertising

About us

Contact us

Privacy Policy

The Commons
Life and Work

Landmark Trust USA receives Thompson Trust challenge grant

Donations to match the challenge grant can be made online at www.LandmarkTrustUSA.org or by check to the Landmark Trust USA, 707 Kipling Road, Dummerston, VT 05301. For further information or to inquire about donating securities or investments, contact Tristam Johnson, Interim Executive Director, at 802-257-7783.

Originally published in The Commons issue #439 (Wednesday, December 20, 2017). This story appeared on page D2.



DUMMERSTON—The Landmark Trust USA, the nonprofit group that manages Rudyard Kipling’s Naulakha in Dummerston, has been offered a challenge grant from the Thomas Thompson Trust of Boston to increase the capacity of the historic preservation organization.

The Thompson Trust has agreed to provide a grant of $25,000 if the Landmark Trust USA can raise an equivalent amount by March 31, 2018. The challenge grant will help the Landmark Trust USA extend the impact of its public programs and increase its capacity to preserve historic properties.

The Landmark Trust USA rescues, restores, and then manages, vacant or underutilized historic properties for public use as short-term vacation rentals. Its model of conservative restoration and short-term rental provides an opportunity for people to discover and enjoy historic properties on a personal level. The organization was established in 1991 as an independent not-for-profit spin-off of the Landmark Trust UK.

In addition to Rudyard Kipling’s Naulakha, the Landmark Trust USA has restored the Kipling Carriage House, the Dutton Farm House, and the Scott Farm Sugar House in Dummerston as well as the Amos Brown House in Whitingham. All five properties are available as vacation rentals.

The Landmark Trust USA also owns and operates the scenic Scott Farm in Dummerston as a model of sound and sustainable local agriculture. The working farm has over 125 heirloom varieties of apples introduced and grown ecologically by internationally-known orchardist, Ezekiel Goodband.

What do you think? Leave us a comment

Editor’s note: Our terms of service require you to use your real names. We will remove anonymous or pseudonymous comments that come to our attention. We rely on our readers’ personal integrity to stand behind what they say; please do not write anything to someone that you wouldn’t say to his or her face without your needing to wear a ski mask while saying it. Thanks for doing your part to make your responses forceful, thoughtful, provocative, and civil. We also consider your comments for the letters column in the print newspaper.