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The Commons
The Arts

Stone Church Arts presents Duo LiveOak

Tickets in advance are $20 general admission, $15 for seniors, and $45 for premium, reserved seats. At the door, prices increase by $5 to $25 general admission and $20 for seniors. Information and advance tickets are available in person at Village Square Booksellers on the Square in Bellows Falls, by phone at 802-460-0110, and online at www.stonechurcharts.org.

Originally published in The Commons issue #454 (Wednesday, April 11, 2018). This story appeared on page B2.


BELLOWS FALLS—On Saturday, April 14, at 7:30 p.m., Stone Church Arts will present Duo LiveOak (Nancy Knowles, soprano, and Frank Wallace, guitarist/baritone/composer). They will perform original compositions and songs from the middle ages to the present day, accompanied by the guitar and its ancestors.

In concert, LiveOak is known for its versatility, grace, and spontaneity, according to a news release. Their concert will take place in the intimate Chapel of Immanuel Episcopal Church, the stone church on the hill, 20 Church St.

The “live oak” is an evergreen oak known for its strength and long life. It has been a symbol of revitalization since ancient times. Wallace and Knowles sing and play with passion and drama, combining rich vocal harmonies, virtuosic playing, and acting skills to create performances that transcend the standard recital format.

LiveOak made its name in medieval and renaissance music in the 1980s and early 1990s. In the last decade, Wallace has become a formidable composer of music for solo classical guitar, and most recently, of songs with either guitar or lute accompaniment, often with Knowles’ poetry for text.

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