News and Views

News

Voices

Arts

Life and Work

Milestones

Submit your news

Submit commentary

Support us

Become a member

Advertising

Print advertising

Web advertising

About us

Contact us

Privacy Policy

The Commons
Town and Village

Towns to fight racism with film

Originally published in The Commons issue #462 (Wednesday, June 6, 2018). This story appeared on page A4.


JAMAICA—The Windham County town of Jamaica and village of West Townshend are neighbors on the map — and, increasingly, in the fight against racism.

The Jamaica Community Arts Council held a “Reading Frederick Douglass” program last summer that drew 50 people. West Townshend’s Community Project, for its part, reports equally strong attendance at its annual winter Martin Luther King Jr. Day observance.

This January the two communities came together to co-sponsor a King event. And this Sunday, June 10, they’ll join again for a screening of a new film about former slave and abolitionist activist Josiah Henson.

“When we heard about this documentary,” West Townshend resident Jay Warren says, “it sounded like an opportunity for the community to keep the conversation going.”

Henson was the inspiration for Harriet Beecher Stowe’s 1852 abolitionist novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” The documentary details his harrowing journey from slavery in the South to fleeing to freedom in Canada, where he purchased land to build what became one of the final stops on the Underground Railroad.

The free screening is set for Sunday, June 10, at 11:30 a.m., at Jamaica Town Hall, with a potluck lunch to follow.

“We hope to raise consciousness about racism,” Warren says, “how it impacts us and how we can combat it.”

What do you think? Leave us a comment

Editor’s note: Our terms of service require you to use your real names. We will remove anonymous or pseudonymous comments that come to our attention. We rely on our readers’ personal integrity to stand behind what they say; please do not write anything to someone that you wouldn’t say to his or her face without your needing to wear a ski mask while saying it. Thanks for doing your part to make your responses forceful, thoughtful, provocative, and civil. We also consider your comments for the letters column in the print newspaper.