$(document).ready(function() { $(window).scroll(function() { if ($('body').height() <= ($(window).height() + $(window).scrollTop()+500)) { $('#upnext').css('display','block'); }else { $('#upnext').css('display','none'); } }); });
Not-for-Profit, Award-Winning Community News and Views for Windham County, Vermont • Since 2006

CALENDAR LISTINGS FOR Saturday, November 

2

Performing arts

DUMMERSTON "Bell, Book and Candle": Set in New York in the 1950s, this is a romantic comedy about Gillian Holroyd, a modern witch seeking to sample human romance. She enchants her neighbor, Shepherd Henderson, who happens to be engaged to one of her enemies. First produced in 1950, it was later made into a movie starring Kim Novak and Jimmy Stewart. Written by John Van Druten, this Vermont Theatre Company production is directed by Robert Wellington with Brenda L. Seitz as stage manager and Michelle Page and Jonathan Kinnersley as producers. "Bell, Book and Candle" is an American classic. 11/1, 11/2: 7:30 p.m. 11/3: 3 p.m. Repeats 11/8-11/10. $15, $13 students and seniors. Evening Star Grange, 1008 East-West Rd. Information: 802-254-1138.

BRATTLEBORO "Clown TV!": Written and directed by NEYT alum Doran Hamm, aided by Amy Majer, Putnam Smith, and all of the young comedians. Uproarius fun for the whole family. These 11 young actors learned from masters in clowning technique, experimenting with sound, pantomime, and movement to physicalize the telling of a story. Guest artists include NEYT founder and clowning extraordinaire Stephen Stearns; Nettie Lane, a circus arts expert; Shoshana Bass, NEYT alum and dance guru; Peter Gould, funnery master; and juggling wizard Tom Yahner. 11/2: 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. (Repeats 11/8, 11/9). Through Saturday, November 9. $11, $10 seniors, $7 children. New England Youth Theatre, 100 Flat St. Information: 802-246-6398; Click for more info on Web in new window.

BELLOWS FALLS "The Secret Garden": Frances Hodgson Burnett could not have imagined that the children's classic she penned in 1911 would resonate in 2019 with young and old who are concerned with climate change. Dir. David Stern and his crew of actors, set builders, costumers have created a magical world that jumps in and out of India and England as it tells the story of the healing power of the garden where Mary Lennox and the wheelchair-bound Colin Craven meet and find friendship. The large cast/crew includes about 36 actors ages 12-71 and an orchestra of 17 led by Ken Olsson. The musical tells the story of 11-year-old Mary, orphaned in India by an epidemic of cholera, who returns to Yorkshire to live with her embittered, reclusive Uncle Archibald and his invalid son Colin on their estate. Among its wonders, she discovers a magic garden that beckons the children with haunting melodies and the "Dreamers," spirits from Mary's past who guide her through her new life, dramatizing The Secret Garden's compelling tale of forgiveness and renewal. This is a Main Street Arts production. 7:30 p.m: 10/31, 11/1, 11/2. 2 p.m. Matinee: 11/2. $7 to $40. Bellows Falls Opera House, Town Hall, 7 Square. Tickets: 802-869-2960, www.mainstreetarts.org.

BRATTLEBORO "Halloween Horror - American Gothic": An Anthology of Terrifying Tales: ​In the tradition of The Twilight Zone, Creepshow, Dead Of Night, and Black Mirror, Shoot The Moon presents their Annual Halloween Show. The story focuses on Joe, who is called to a country house for a possible job. Once Joe arrives, he realizes that he's been there before many times- but only in in his dreams. Oddly, the other guests each have their own strange and terrifying tale and relay it to Joe. As our evening barrels toward its conclusion, Joe can't help but feel that he's forgotten something, an important detail. Will Joe remember it in time? Or will his dream become the nightmare he fears? Tales woven through Joe's story showcase: a man who is stalked by Death, a harrowing night babysitting, a ghostly game of hide and seek, a nostalgic trip to Lover's Lane, and a ride on the ghastly Night Train. Starring: Elias Burgess, Terry Carter, Lionel Chute, Josh Goldstein, Fiona Goodman, Colin Grube, Dashiell Moyse, Jennifer Moyse, John Ogorzalek. Stage Mgr: Alistair Follansbee, Director: Joshua Moyse. 7:30 p.m. $13. Hooker-Dunham Theater, 139 Main St. Information: 802-254-9276; Click for more info on Web in new window.

The written word

BRATTLEBORO In the Eye of the Beholder - A Writing Workshop for Teachers: Creativity reveals itself in many forms and across all ages. Through facilitated art appreciation and written expression, students and adults alike can enhance their skills and interests. This workshop with writer, journalist, VT Humanities Council Scholar Elayne Clift is designed to help teachers encourage creative expression among their students. Writing prompts based on BMAC's current exhibits will provide a model for writing activities for teachers to use later with students. The techniques used all lend themselves to adaptation for younger audiences who, along with their teachers, will discover the pleasure of art that inspires the written word. 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Teachers earn 3 professional development hours. $35. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, 28 Vernon St. Registration required (up to 10 participants): 802-257-0124 x 101.

BRATTLEBORO Brattleboro Poetry Discussion Group: No experience necessary; copies of the poems provided. 12 noon - 2 p.m. Free. Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St. Information: info@timetowrite.us.

Visual arts and shows

NEWFANE Chris Carter - "Collection of Inspiration and Solitude" Oils and Watercolor: 11/2: Artist reception, 1 - 3 p.m. Through Friday, November 29. Free. Crowell Gallery at the Moore Free Library, 23 West St. Information: 802-365-7948; Click for more info on Web in new window.

Ideas and education

BELLOWS FALLS "The Counterculture's Impact on Vermont and Vermont's Influence on the Counterculture Generation": Yvonne Daley discusses her latest book, "Going Up the Country: When the Hippies, Dreamers, Freaks and Radicals Moved to Vermont." The result of this collaboration of cultures remains evident today, making Vermont a state that blends progressive and conservative values and ideas. Light refreshments served. Sponsored by the Rockingham Historic Preservation Commission. 12 noon. Free. Rockingham Free Public Library, 65 Westminster St. Information: 802-463-4270; Click for more info on Web in new window.

Film and video

BRATTLEBORO Environmental Film Day - 2019 Brattleboro Film Festival : Five feature documentary films and one short drama with environmental themes ranging from devastatingly eye opening to hopeful and transcendent: "The Pollinators," "The River and the Wall (also showing 11/9)" "The Human Element," "The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating," "Anthropocene: The Human Epoch.". 11 a.m. - 6:50 p.m. Per film: $10; $8 seniors/college students w/ ID; free for high school students w/ ID and younger students. Latchis Theatre, 50 Main St. Information: www.brattleborofilmfestival.org.

Music

BRATTLEBORO The Harold Lopez-Nussa Quartet - Free Workshop followed by Concert: This quartet from Cuba performs Cuban and Jazz Standards as well as originals, grooves, and improvisations. Harold Lopez-Nussa, piano; Mayquel Gonzalez, trumpet; Julio Ceasar Gonzalez, electric bass; Ruy Adrian Lopez-Nussa, drums and percussion. They musicians are here as part of a tour that will take them to seven venues on the East Coast as well as performances in France and the United Kingdom. 2 p.m. Free Workshop on the basic building blocks of Cuban jazz performance/style - young performers (under 21) are encouraged to bring their instruments. 8 p.m. Concert. $20, $15 students with I.D. (contact VJC about educational discounts). Vermont Jazz Center, 72 Cotton Mill Hill, #222. Tickets: 802-254-9088, www.vtjazz.org.

PUTNEY StompBox Trio and Pumpkintown: Americana music/art with StompBox Trio (Evelyn Harris, John Caban, David Rodriguez) and Pumpkintown (Tim Eriksen and Susan Brearey). StompBox Trio reaches the wellspring of vintage American blues/funk/soul. Pumpkintown is stories/music/magic lantern projections from an imaginary New England village. Punk-folk pioneer Eriksen is acclaimed for his interpretations of old ballads, love songs, shape-note gospel, dance tunes from New England/ Southern Appalachia. He combines vocals with inventive accompaniment on banjo, fiddle, guitar, bajo sexto (12-string Mexican acoustic bass). Painter Brearey is known for her depiction of animals - primal, totemic images take the place of photorealistic visual details found in some other works of wildlife art - primeval shapes, rudimentary, almost featureless, set against abstract surfaces. The pair take you to Pumpkintown, where the village is imaginary but the music is real – revealing an America that has never been simply black and white but evidences a deep-seated diversity. Be immersed in the sounds of a place that is at once imagined/deeply true: shape-note harmony by the first published Native American composer, fiery Scottish fiddle tunes, apocalyptic Afro-Celtic gospel, traditional and original songs of war, the sea, traveling, tragedy/love, that tie it all together. 7:30 p.m. $20 ($24 at door). Next Stage Arts Project, 15 Kimball Hill. Information: 802-387-0102; Click for more info on Web in new window.

BELLOWS FALLS The End Of America and Oshima Brothers: Both bands feature impeccable harmonies and finely crafted songwriting. This is the first show of an Eastern US tour by the two bands. The End Of America was voted "Favorite New Artist" at the Philadelphia Folk Festival and won the Emerging Artist Showcase at Falcon Ridge, returning the next year as that festival's "Most Wanted" band. Oshima Brothers' acoustic folk-pop has been lauded by NPR's World Cafe. Their performances are unexpectedly full-sounding, with dynamic vocals, electric and acoustic guitars, octave bass, loops, percussion, and more - or, when it suits a song, a stripped down, beautifully spare arrangement. 6 p.m. doors open, 7 p.m. music. $25 best-in-house, $20 darned-good-seats, $15 chair-not-guaranteed, $20 at the door. Bands receive 100% of ticket sales. Stage 33 Live, 33 Bridge St. Information: www.stage33live.com.

Recreation

ATHENS Hike to Historic Sites on Athens Dome: Windmill Hill Pinnacle Association leads this walk to historic sites on WHPA properties in Athens and Grafton. See the remains of the historic Goodridge and Smith Soapstone quarries, quarry pools, cellar holes, mill foundation, and old roads. This area, which is adjacent to the Turner Hill Wildlife Management Area, has significant wildlife habitat including wetlands and very productive beech/oak/cherry mast stands. If it is a good year for beech nuts, we should find evidence of black bears feeding in the trees. The hike is moderate, there may be some water in the old roads depending on previous weather, watertight boots recommended. Hike leaders are Camil Roberts and Andrew Toepfer. 12:30-3:30 p.m. Moderate hike. Watertight boots recommended (there may be water in old roads). Free. Athens Pond, Rt. 35 (6 1/2 miles north of Townshend or 3 1/2 miles south of Cambridgeport on Rt. 35). Register: 802-869-3379, a.l.toepfer@gmail.com.

BRATTLEBORO Naturalist Club Outing - Green River Ledges: The Green River carves its way south through calcium-rich Waits River Formation bedrock. We will drive the very scenic Green River Road, stopping at steep ledge outcrops to look for the suite of unusual plants (or remnants thereof) that thrive there, including ferns, mosses, and liverworts. November oak colors are lovely. With Naturalist Patti Smith. 2 p.m. Meet in the parking lot (southeast corner). Free (donations welcome). Price Chopper, 499 Canal St. Register: 802-257-5785, www.beec.org.

Farmers' markets

BRATTLEBORO Brattleboro Winter Farmers' Market: Weekly diverse indoor farmers market. Local farm produce, meats, syrup, fresh baked goods, local cheeses, fruits, cider, pickles, preserves, handmade jewelry, pottery, soaps, and more. Lunch menu and live music with Decatur Creek. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Bring shopping bags or buy ours. Through Saturday, March 28. C. F. Church Building, 80 Flat St. Information: 802-869-2141, farmersmarket@postoilsolutions.org, www.brattleborowinterfarmersmarket.org.

Well-being

BRATTLEBORO Yoga Locally: Vigorous Vinyasa taught by Laura Tabachnick. 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. (Saturdays), 5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. (Tuesdays). Donations benefit Brattleboro nonprofits. One Eighteen Elliot, 118 Elliot St. Information: ; Click for more info on Web in new window.

Community building

BRATTLEBORO "War on Terror" - Veterans Recognition Day: Seminar and dinner. 1 p.m. Opening, 6 p.m. Dinner at American Legion. (Seminars also will be at 2:30 and 4 p.m. at Brooks Memorial Library, Brattleboro Historical Society, and Brattleboro Savings and Loan). American Legion Hall (Post 5), 32 Linden St. Information: 802-254-5290.

BRATTLEBORO Sheet Mulching Permablitz with Edible Brattleboro - A Hands-On Workshop: Fall is the time to prepare new beds for spring planting. We will teach this method of building healthy soil as we create a new bed in our Help-Yourself garden.Come ready to move organic matter, move soil, and get a little dirty. If you can, bring garden gloves and a spade. 10 - 11:30 a.m. in Brattleboro's Help-Yourself Garden. Donations accepted with gratitude. Brattleboro Food Co-op, 2 Main St. Register: ediblebrattleboro@gmail.com.

Dance

GREENFIELD Dance Slangpolska!: Open Dancing including other Swedish and couple dances. No partner necessary. Bring leather-soled shoes. 1 - 2 p.m. Class, 2 - 4:30 p.m. Open Dancing. $10 to $25 sliding scale. Guiding Star Grange, 401 Chapman St. Information: 802-579-5975, annamarie_vt@me.com.

CALENDAR

CALENDAR

November 2019
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930