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Big Woods Voices: Becky Graber, Alan Blood, Will Danforth, and Amanda Witman.

The Arts

Big Woods Voices performs Nov. 9

Tickets in advance are $20 general admission, $15 for seniors and $45 for premium, reserved seats. At the door, prices increase by $5 to $25 general admission and $20 for seniors. Information and tickets are available in person at Village Square Booksellers in Bellows Falls and Misty Valley Books in Chester, by phone at 802-460-0110, and online at www.stonechurcharts.org.

BELLOWS FALLS—Stone Church Arts brings the a capella quartet Big Woods Voices to the stone church on the hill in Bellows Falls on Friday, Nov. 9, at 7:30 p.m. The concert will be in the chapel at Immanuel Episcopal Church, 20 Church St.

Big Woods Voices unites four veteran area singers in celebrating their common passion for a cappella harmony: Alan Blood, long-time member of area groups including the Blanche Moyse Chorale, I Cantori, Blue Moon, and House Blend; Will Danforth, singer-songwriter, traditional acoustic artist, and the group’s arranger/composer; Becky Graber, leader of the Brattleboro Women’s Chorus and Animaterra Women’s Chorus in Keene; and Amanda Witman, founder and co-leader of the Brattleboro Pub Sing with Tony Barrand.

Reveling in vocal harmony, Big Woods Voices marries singing traditions from around the world with various American roots genres. Danforth concocts original compositions and arrangements in which harmony and dissonance dance in complex yet accessible soundscapes.

The group’s repertoire includes lyrical settings of poetry by David Whyte, Mary Oliver, W.B. Yeats and others; richly-harmonized standards of the American roots lexicon; original compositions; and works by musicians such as Pete Sutherland, The Finest Kind, and the Stanley Brothers.

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Originally published in The Commons issue #484 (Wednesday, November 7, 2018). This story appeared on page B2.

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