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Not-for-Profit, Award-Winning Community News and Views for Windham County, Vermont • Since 2006
Town and Village

World AIDS Day observance is Dec. 2

BRATTLEBORO—The AIDS Project of Southern Vermont invites the public to a World AIDS Day observation Monday, Dec. 2, at noon at the Centre Congregational Church downtown.

The commemoration of those affected by the virus and those working to combat it will feature a sidewalk candlelight vigil followed by Rev. Scott Couper, who will speak about his HIV/AIDS work in Africa. Music will be provided by the Green Mountain Strummers.

“By providing people with information on how HIV is transmitted and encouraging them to get tested, we hope they will have the skills, knowledge, and capability to protect themselves from HIV,” AIDS Project Executive Director Karen Peterson said in a news release. “There are medications that help you live longer, but if you can avoid getting the disease, it’s so much better.”

The Brattleboro-based project — serving more than 80 clients in Bennington and Windham counties — is one of three AIDS service organizations in the state working to balance steady caseloads as the federal government shifts its financial assistance from smaller towns to bigger cities. About 600 people statewide are living with the human immunodeficiency virus that causes the disease.

Since the beginning of the epidemic, nearly 40 million people have died of AIDS — and now an equal number are living with HIV.

That figure is both good and bad news. At least a dozen or more Vermonters, nearly 40,000 Americans and 2 million people worldwide are newly diagnosed annually. But an infection that older generations once feared is now often dismissed as just another sexually transmitted disease.

Local observers of World AIDS Day hope to change that.

More local information is available by calling 802-254-4444 or logging onto the AIDS Project of Southern Vermont’s website, www.aidsprojectsouthernvermont.org.

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Originally published in The Commons issue #538 (Wednesday, November 27, 2019). This story appeared on page E2.

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