Jeff Potter

A mural with meaning

A mural with meaning

With the help a diverse group of young people, Juniper Creative Arts creates a mural that lets BIPOC people see themselves in public art with power and joy

Sitting at tables under a large tent that provides cover from a strong sun on this summer Saturday, a group of young artists excitedly but quietly work with markers, paint, and other art supplies.

Several teens paint on three sturdy wood panels where the stark outlines of large, plain swaths of warm, bright colors have just begun coming into focus.

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American dream

Three glimpses of Afghan refugees’ journey as they become Vermonters

Editor's note: Thanks to the Ethiopian Community Development Council, the nonprofit organization responsible for administering the Afghan refugee resettlement program, we present a series of Voices contributions about the herculean efforts to bring 100 people from across the world to shelter and safety. We had hoped to present these...

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‘It’s about place, where you are’

For Rich Holschuh, adding spoken Abenaki language to the experience lets hikers hear, feel, and understand a multigenerational Native presence along the Sibosen Trail

For Rich Holschuh, the inclusion of technology to let people hear his pronunciation of indigenous words on interpretive signs along the Sibosen Trail “deepens and expands the story.” As director of the Atowi Project at the Retreat Farm on Route 30, Holschuh now works full time helping people see...

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It stops here

It would have been easy - so, so easy - to find any rationale or excuse to avoid publishing Mindy Haskins Rogers' piece, which shines light on the behavior of Robert (Zeke) Hecker, a longtime English teacher at Brattleboro Union High School, a playwright, and a musician. I don't want to ruffle feathers. I don't want to upset the arts community. I don't want to disrupt lives in a small town. I don't want the obvious collateral damage - this...

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‘Something for everybody’

Kate Barry starts opening the first of a stack of cardboard boxes on the bar, her smile broadening into a grin. “These are our light fixtures,” she says excitedly, as her husband, Bruce Hunt, tools in hand, looks on, and their 3-year-old daughter, Juniper, sits on a barstool momentarily entranced by a solitary Lincoln log that she found here, somewhere in the space that will become The Collective. “All of this is new,” Barry says, gesturing to a gleaming array...

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When we can’t have our normal holidays, we need them more than ever

For too many people, holidays are already fraught with complexity and difficulties. A global health catastrophe is the last thing they need to add to the mix. For so many of us, the recent words of urgency from Gov. Phil Scott have created a gargantuan conflict. We want to see family for the holidays. We need to see them. Our hearts ache for grandkids we haven't hugged. We sense the time passing for older relatives who aren't well. Many of...

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‘We landed it’

The vibe of the small crowd gathered on Oct. 3 was subdued - perhaps for many, an expression of dumbstruck disbelief that this day had actually arrived. They came - masked and distanced, of course - to observe the dedication of the Perseverance Skatepark on this brilliant autumn Saturday morning, in a quick ceremony. As the ceremony marked the opening of the long-awaited park, it also symbolized the end of a roundabout - and, for many, agonizing - journey of...

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COVID-19 fears bring conflict to the fore

While affirming its following of COVID-19 safety regimens and state government protocols with regard to the fencing camp held on the Degrees of Freedom campus in August, Seth Andrew, the founder of the nascent program told town officials that he and his team will “not be bullied or engage with anyone who continues the unfounded and xenophobic attacks on us or anyone not from Marlboro.” In the end, town officials concluded that the participants in the fencing camp adequately followed...

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